Government should rethink relaxed Christmas rules; urges Sadiq Khan

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LONDON: Mayor Sadiq Khan has urged the government to review the relaxation of rules over the Christmas period amid fears of a surge in coronavirus cases in January and increased pressure on the NHS.

In an appeal to Londoners after the capital was placed into the more severe level of restrictions, the mayor also stressed that following the eased rules over the festive period is not “mandatory”, the Independent has reported.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan

“Just because you are allowed to see other households doesn’t mean you have too,” he said. “If you are seeing an older relation there’s no need to kiss, hug and spend too much time embracing them.”

Under current proposals agreed between the UK government and the devolved administrations, people are permitted see their relatives and to form “bubbles” with three households between 23-27 December.

The government has said there are no plans to reconsider the plans, but Matt Hancock, the health secretary, warned on Monday he could not rule out “further action” after plunging millions of people in the capital and southeast into the toughest Tier 3 restrictions.

Mr Khan toldBBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “My concern is many people may have the virus, not realise it, they could pass the virus on to an older relation and we are so close now to the end of this – the vaccine is being rolled out and families will kick themselves if they pass the virus on during Christmas.

“The experts are saying the relaxation in rules will lead to increase in the virus. The experts are saying we could well be seeing in January a surge in the virus for the simple reason that more and more people are mixing and mingling.” Pressed on whether he was asking the government to rethink the rules, he replied: “I’ve been clear to the government, I’m concerned about going from Tier 2 to Tier 3 to Tier 0 to Tier 3 potentially to a national lockdown and the NHS being overwhelmed in January and lives being lost. “I think the government should look at the rules again, but it’s got to be a four-nation approach. What nobody wants is one rule for