People in poorest areas twice as likely to die from Covid-19 as those in affluent areas: ONS

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LONDON: The Covid-19 mortality rate in deprived areas of England and Wales is double that of more affluent places, new data from the Office for National Statistics reveal. 

The ONS found that, in the most deprived areas of England, the age-standardised mortality rate of deaths involving Covid-19 was 55.1 deaths per 100,000 people, compared to just 25.3 deaths per 100,000 in the least deprived areas, the Huffpost has reported.

Wales saw a similar disparity in deaths – a mortality rate of 44.6 deaths per 100,000 in deprived areas, compared to 23.2 in well-off areas.  However, the local authorities with the highest age-standardised mortality rates for Covid-19 deaths were all in London. 

In Newham, there were 144.3 deaths per 100,000 of the population – the highest mortality rate in the ONS data for any local authority.  It was followed by Brent, which had a rate of 141.5 deaths per 100,000, and Hackney, with a rate of 127.4 deaths per 100,000. 

The ONS statistics were based on deaths that occurred between March 1 and April 17, and were recorded by April 18. Earlier statistics covering the same period published earlier this week included a slightly higher number of overall deaths as they included deaths that were recorded late.

Overall, after data was adjusted for size and age structure of the population, there were 36.2 coronavirus deaths per 100,000 people in England and Wales. Nick Stripe, head of health analysis at the ONS, said: “By mid-April, the region with the highest proportion of deaths involving Covid-19 was London, with the virus being involved in more than four in 10 deaths since the start of March.

In contrast, the region with the lowest proportion of Covid-19 deaths was the south-west, which saw just over one in 10 deaths involving coronavirus. The 11 local authorities with the highest mortality rates were all London boroughs.

“People living in more deprived areas have experienced Covid-19 mortality rates more than double those living in less deprived areas. General mortality rates are normally higher in more deprived areas, but so far Covid-19 appears to be taking them higher still.”