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ISLAMABAD: Closing doors of dialogue with India, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan has said he would no longer seek dialogue with India. “There is no point in talking to them. I mean, I have done all the talking. Unfortunately, now when I look back, all the overtures that I was making for peace and dialogue, I think they took it for appeasement,” he said in an interview with New York Times adding; “There is nothing more that we can do.”

The premiersaid lives of eight million Kashmiris are atstake.”We are all worried that there is ethnic cleansing and genocide about to happen.”He warned that Pakistan would be forced to respond ifIndia launched a military action against his country. He said India might launch a deceptive false-flag operation in Kashmir to justify action against Pakistan. “My worry is that this can escalate and for two nucleararmed countries, it should be alarming forthe world what we are facing now,” he told theAmerican news media site. Imran Khan intensified his criticism of India on Wednesday over its Kashmir crackdown, saying he would no longer seek dialogue with Indian officials and raising the threat of a military escalation between the nuclear-armed neighbours. He complained bitterly about what he described asrepeated rebuffsfrom Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India at his entreaties for communication, both before and after the Aug. 5 crackdown on the disputed territory of Kashmir. “There is no point in talking to them. I mean, I have done all the talking. Unfortunately, now when I look back, all the overtures that I was making for peace and dialogue, I think they took it for appeasement,” Mr. Khan said during the interview, at the prime minister’s office in Islamabad. “There is nothing more that we can do.” Echoing what he and his subordinates have said on socialmedia and in Pakistani news outlets,Mr.Khan describedMr.Modi as a fascist and Hindu supremacist who intends to eradicate Kashmir’s mostly Muslimpopulation and populate the region with Hindus. “The most important thing isthat eightmillion people’slives are atrisk.We are all worried that there is ethnic cleansing and genocide about to happen,” Mr. Khan said. Such accusations have been dismissed as absurd by Mr. Modi’s government. “My worry is that this can escalate and for two nuclear-armed countries, itshould be alarming for theworldwhatwe are facing now.” Bajwa-Imran meeting: Meanwhile, Pakistan Chief of Army Staff Gen Qamar Javed Bajwa met PM Imran Khan at PM Office in Islamabad on Thursday and discussed the overall situation in detail. According to reliable sources, Gen Bajwa fully supported and appreciated the stand taken by Imran Khan in an interview with New York Times. “We are fully prepared and can tackle any odd situation”, Gen Bajwa assured the prime minister. Indian envoy rejects: There was no immediate comment from the Indian government in New Delhi on Mr. Khan’s remarks. But India’s ambassador to the United States, Harsh Vardhan Shringla, who was visiting The New York Times editorial board, rejected the criticism. “Our experience has been that every time we have taken an initiative toward peace, it hasturned out badly for us,” the ambassadorsaid. “We expect Pakistan to take credible, irreversible and verifiable action against terrorism.” He also disputed the severity of India’s actions in Kashmir. “We are looking at things going back to normal,” he said. “Restrictions are being eased based on the ground situation.” “Public utility services, banks and hospitals are functioning normally,” the Indian ambassador added. “There are adequate food stocks. Some restrictions on communication are in the interests of safety and security of the citizenry.” Indian officials have described their new policy on Kashmir as a legal and internal matter that was part of an effort to improve the region’s economic prospects. They have said the deployment of armed forces was precautionary, preventive and temporary.