Aamir Khan’s Secret Superstar is going to China

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MUMBAI: PK and Dangal have established Aamir Khan in China and this time he’s set to woo Chinese audiences with Secret Superstar. According to Hindustan Times, Aamir is already working towards the film’s release. “Secret Superstar will definitely release in China in the next one or two months. We are working on the planning aspect of it,” said the actor.
Khan, 52, plays a sleazy music producer in the film and is in second lead to teenager Zaira Wasim, playing a schoolgirl named Insia Malik from a small town who defies her conservative Muslim family to pursue her dream of a singing career.
Though his film has amassed critical acclaim, Aamir says he doesn’t rely on box office numbers to measure his film’s success. “Box office numbers are just one yardstick about the success of a film. If you see the numbers, we have earned double than the budget of the film. Normally, the film which recover it’s cost is called a hit, then this film should be called a super hit.”
Secret Superstar hit theatres Oct 19.
It’s no secret that audiences the world over expect a lot from Bollywood superstar Aamir Khan. And so is the case with Aamir’s Diwali release Secret Superstar, which will be hitting the theatres worldwide October 19 (tomorrow).
Khan, 52, plays a sleazy music producer in Secret Superstar and is in second lead to teenager Zaira Wasim, playing a schoolgirl named Insia Malik from a small town who defies her conservative Muslim family to pursue her dream of a singing career.
The judgements from the pre-release screenings are in and here’s what critics have to say about it:
Zaira is the secret
“The biggest strength of Secret Superstar is the wonderful Wasim… it is such a delight to see a 15-year-old look and feel like a 15 year old, and not a painted doll,” writes Shubhra Gupta for The Indian Express.
Writing for NDTV, Saibal Chatterjee, says, if after “nit-picking”, the film as a whole doesn’t steal your heart, “the magnificent Zaira Wasim certainly will”.
Throughout the reviews, the biggest take-away has been this: the mother-daughter bond can take down the patriarchal structure, many times inadvertently perpetrated by the women of the family.
Najma, Insia’s mother, played by Meher Vij, is a typical submissive yet supportive mother of a middle-class, conservative Muslim household. She is trapped in an unhappy marriage and is financially dependent on her abusive husband ? which makes it all the more difficult to smash the chains of patriarchy for married South Asian women and mothers.
“Mujhse maang lena, zindagi se nahin, (Ask from me, but not from life),” Insia’s mother Najma (played by Meher Vij) tells her when Insia “expresses a desire for something that appears to be beyond the ken of the possible”. But Insia rebels.
The 15-year-old girl fuels her battered mother into declaring mutiny and argues for divorce, a taboo in most Muslim households. Other characters also chime in support of Insia’s stand on the issue of domestic violence ? an attempt from debutant director Advait Chandan who sews divorce as a logical recourse for women stuck in abusive marriages.